Featured Posts

To top

Author: paulgarner

1 Nov

FISHING PHOTOGRAPHY PT5

There are few more anxious moments in fishing when you have finally got a new personal best resting in the net and suddenly realize that you are the only one on the bank with no one to help you get a decent photo. Perhaps you might have a good mate that will come out and do the shots for you, but if you are anything like me, it is likely to be the middle of a wet night and you are many miles from home. The good news is that getting good self-take photographs is actually not that difficult, as long as you follow some simple rules and get yourself into a regular routine. Most of the steps are exactly the...
Continue reading
19 Oct

EARLSWOOD LAKE VLOG

I am planning to put together some semi-regular blogs on my own fishing over the next few months. A lot of these will be combined with photo-shoots or other work, so hopefully will tie in nicely with some of my printed articles and give a 'behind-the-scenes' look at some of the things I get up to. Here is the first one, shot a while back at the prolific Earlswood Lakes in the West Midlands.   ...
Continue reading
17 Aug

NEW SERIES ON YOUTUBE

Over the last few weeks I have stopped procrastinating and started to the hopefully not too painful process of shooting and editing some videos to go alongside my photography content. Of course, in the modern world, online video media is becoming tremendously important and it is essential to move with the times. I find the best way of learning is to actually produce something with an end goal in mind, so to that end I thought that a relatively straight-forward project would be to produce some how-to photography films. So here goes, my first effort, not the most polished video of all time, but hopefully it will be informative at least. Watch this space for more videos coming...
Continue reading
22 Jul

WHAT’S IN THE BOX? – TENCH

My tench box is looking a little worse for wear after quite an eventful spring. Whilst sorting it out the other day and replenishing some of the items that were running low I thought I would take the opportunity to get a few pictures for this feature and run through what I use. I think the first thing you might notice is that it is a lot less ‘carpy’ than my bream box that was featured a while back. OK, I carry a few lead clips and other bits ‘n’ bobs, but most of the items are orientated towards maggot and caster fishing. Hooks are smaller in general, my main hooklength material is 10lb Berkley fluorocarbon and I...
Continue reading
16 Jul

FISHING PHOTOGRAPHY PT4

One of the main reasons I guess most of us carry a camera when we go fishing is to get decent shots of the fish our mates and we catch. This month I am going to concentrate on how to take shots of your mates with fish, before going on to self-takes next month. I must admit, I really enjoy taking pictures of my buddies with their fish, and getting them some lasting pictures to go with their memories. Catch shots aren’t really that technically challenging, after all it is just a ‘bloke with a fish’. Normally I follow a well-rehearsed routine to get the shots I want, which means the fish get back quickly and as much...
Continue reading
14 Jun

HUNG UP ON YOU

Over the last few seasons I have noticed that some swims on my local rivers have become increasingly snaggy, with some verging on impossible to fish safely. On closer inspection, in some instances, it would appear that the ‘snags’ are actually lost line and rigs that are collecting on natural obstructions. “Use stronger gear, so that you are not having to pull for a break,” you might cry. Well, yes, that is a possible option, but it is often the use of strong gear that is making the situation worse, especially when using hooklengths that are stronger than the main line. If you use a coated braid or braided hooklength then this is likely to be the case....
Continue reading
25 May

FISHING PHOTOGRAPHY 3

All photography is reliant upon light, and generally the more of it that you have the better. Whilst modern digital cameras are in some ways more forgiving of the poor light conditions that we as anglers often have to cope with, the same rules apply as they did with film, and very often there are some big compromises to be made. Digital cameras work by little parcels of light, called photons, activating the millions of photo-reactive cells packed onto the cameras image sensor hidden away behind the lens. The more light there is the more often these cells are activated, giving a better image. We touched on the ISO button on the camera in part 2, and this...
Continue reading